Fix Your Memory Module
 
Home
News
Products
Shop
Memory
Corporate
Contact
 

News
Industry News
Publications
CST News
Help/Support
Member Area
Tester Brochure
Demo Library
Software
Tester FAQs

biology medicine news product technology definition

Friday, July 21, 2017
Memory Industry News
Email ArticlePrinter Format PreviousNext

Close of a chapter in computer history


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

When Intel launched its first Itanium processor in 2001, it had very high hopes: the 64-bit chip was supposed to do nothing less than kill off the x86 architecture that had dominated PCs for over two decades. Things didn't quite pan out that way, however, and Intel is officially calling it quits. The company tells PCWorld that its just-shipping Itanium 9700-series processors will be the last models in the family. HPE, the enterprise company resulting from the split of Itanium co-creator HP, will be the last major customer -- its extra-reliable Integrity i6 servers are getting the upgraded hardware, but you won't hear much from anyone else.

The news marks the quiet end to a tumultuous saga. Itanium was supposed to represent a clean break from x86 that put Intel firmly into the 64-bit era. It was first intended for high-end servers and workstations, but it was eventually supposed to find its way into home PCs. Needless to say, that's not how it worked out. Early Itanium chips were power hogs, and AMD threw a monkey wrench into Intel's plans by launching 64-bit x86 processors ahead of Intel. Why buy Itanium when you can get many of the benefits of 64-bit technology without tossing your existing software? Intel responded with 64-bit x86 chips of its own, and those quickly took over as Itanium remained the niche option.

That shift effectively killed any hopes of the broad support Itanium needed to survive. Microsoft dropped support in Windows after 2010 , and HP went so far as to sue Oracle for ditching software development in 2011. Not that Intel necessarily minded by that point. It poured most of its energy into many-core Xeon processors that were often up to the job. And it'll be a while before Itanium disappears forever. HPE says that it'll offer Linux-based "containers" that let you run Itanium software on x86 servers, so it'll be relatively easy for companies to jump ship at their own pace.

The cancellation also shows just how much Intel has changed in the past 16 years. Where the chip giant was once obsessed with ruling the high-performance computing world, it's now trying to move beyond the PC. Why pour resources into exotic server CPUs when the future revolves more around drones, wearables and the Internet of Things? Although server chips aren't about to disappear any time soon, Intel clearly has better ways to spend its money.

By: DocMemory
Copyright 2017 CST, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Email ArticlePrinter Format PreviousNext
Latest Industry News
Artificial sensibility reads and determines driver's emotions7/21/2017
Siemens built Digitalisation Hub in Singapore7/21/2017
Qualcomm sales up despite patent entangles7/21/2017
IC Insight forecasts $419 billion semi sales7/21/2017
ZTE profit up 30%7/20/2017
Samsung increased production on HBM2 DRAM7/20/2017
Researchers found quicker way to make rechargable batteries7/20/2017
ASML expects revenue growth from deep EUV 7/20/2017
Toshiba received court order to cancel out WD's original retraining action7/20/2017
Nanya predicts continue DRAM tight supply7/19/2017

CST Inc. Memory Tester DDR Tester
Copyright © 1994 - 2017 CST, Inc. All Rights Reserved